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Takanini Family Health Care

General Practice (GP) Service

Today

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Description

We are a general practice aiming to provide quality healthcare to you and your family.

Consultations are by appointment only. Our standard consultation time is 15 minutes.

If you would like information about enrolling in Counties Medical GP Clinic to see one of our GPs, please call into our Papakura or Takanini Clinic and one of our staff will be happy to assist you.

Papakura is our main GP clinic, open Monday to Friday, with Takanini our satellite clinic, open four days per week. The doctors at Takanini also work at the Papakura clinic.

6-18 O'Shannessey Street, Papakura ph 09 299 9384 or

2 Te Napi Drive, Takanini ph 09 299 7670  - please enter for the GP clinic via the main entrance to Urgent Care and reception staff will assist you.

Staff

Our team is made up of GPs (see details below under doctors) and
Nursing staff: Linda, Mumtaz, Luigi, Sukneet & Gurjit.
Receptionists Anne, Brooke, Glenda, Grace, Ingrid, Josie, Karyn, Kim, Leta, Maria, Petra, Sheryl, Susan, Susan & Tule.

Doctors

Ages

Child / Tamariki, Youth / Rangatahi, Adult / Pakeke, Older adult / Kaumātua

How do I access this service?

Enrolled patients, Make an appointment

Enrolling new patients

Yes

This practice is enrolling new patients.

Please call into either clinic and complete an enrolment form. Please note that this will not be accepted unless accompanied by the correct eligibility documents. Te Whatu Ora guide to eligibility for publicly funded healthcare.

Electronic enrolment form

Fees

Enrolled Patient Fees

Under 14 yearsFree
14-17 yearsFrom $13.00
18-24 yearsFrom $19.50
25-44 yearsFrom $19.50
45-64 yearsFrom $19.50
65+ yearsFrom $19.50

Note that eligibility criteria apply for the $19.50 fee, otherwise the consultation fee is $45. Different charges apply to casual and non-enrolled patients and for other services.

Fees and Charges Categorisation

Fees apply

Hours

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

Mon – Tue 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM
Thu – Fri 8:00 AM – 5:00 PM

Please call our number for out of hours assistance. Your call will be answered by a registered nurse.

Takanini is the satellite GP Clinic of our main clinic - 6-18 O'Shannessey Street, Papakura, which is open Monday to Friday 8am to 5.30pm.

Public Holidays: Closed Labour Day (28 Oct), Auckland Anniversary (27 Jan), Waitangi Day (6 Feb), Good Friday (18 Apr), Easter Sunday (20 Apr), Easter Monday (21 Apr), ANZAC Day (25 Apr), King's Birthday (2 Jun), Matariki (20 Jun).

Preferred urgent care clinic out of hours: Takanini Urgent Care.

Languages Spoken

English

Services Provided

Adult and Child Medical Care

Your GP's surgery is far more than a place to go when you are feeling unwell and needing a quick cure. The doctor who sees you has gone through an extensive medical training to equip her or him to help children and adults of all ages with a range of physical and emotional difficulties. GPs are at the centre of the healthcare hub and will be aware of services and expertise that are available locally and further-a-field. GPs are also aware of the link that stress and unhappy life events have on physical health so know when to suggest a talking therapy rather than medication.

Your GP's surgery is far more than a place to go when you are feeling unwell and needing a quick cure. The doctor who sees you has gone through an extensive medical training to equip her or him to help children and adults of all ages with a range of physical and emotional difficulties. GPs are at the centre of the healthcare hub and will be aware of services and expertise that are available locally and further-a-field. GPs are also aware of the link that stress and unhappy life events have on physical health so know when to suggest a talking therapy rather than medication.

Minor Accident and Injury Care

Primary care practices offer a range of services and are able to deal with most minor accident care. If they are not able to deal with an injury they will refer on to the appropriate service.

Primary care practices offer a range of services and are able to deal with most minor accident care. If they are not able to deal with an injury they will refer on to the appropriate service.

Repeat Prescriptions

Each GP surgery or primary care practice will have its own procedure for repeat prescribing but the following rules are common to most, if not all. Patients who are well-known to the practice who have a stable condition like asthma, hypertension or diabetes could be allowed to get a repeat prescription for up to six months. Repeat prescriptions are never given to patients who are not known to the practice and there is probably a blanket ban on repeats for narcotics and other drugs that could be misused as doctors are expected to monitor these drugs carefully.

Each GP surgery or primary care practice will have its own procedure for repeat prescribing but the following rules are common to most, if not all. Patients who are well-known to the practice who have a stable condition like asthma, hypertension or diabetes could be allowed to get a repeat prescription for up to six months. Repeat prescriptions are never given to patients who are not known to the practice and there is probably a blanket ban on repeats for narcotics and other drugs that could be misused as doctors are expected to monitor these drugs carefully.

Lab Results

Sometimes your doctor needs to take a sample of blood or urine either to discover what is wrong with you or to measure something in your blood so that the right medication is given to you. These tests could be anything from blood sugar to a full blood count or a sample of tissue to test for cancer. While urine can generally be tested in the surgery, blood and other specimens are usually sent away for testing at a laboratory. Most results come back within 48 hours unless a very rare test is needed which has to go to a specialist lab further away when it might take a little longer.

Sometimes your doctor needs to take a sample of blood or urine either to discover what is wrong with you or to measure something in your blood so that the right medication is given to you. These tests could be anything from blood sugar to a full blood count or a sample of tissue to test for cancer.

While urine can generally be tested in the surgery, blood and other specimens are usually sent away for testing at a laboratory. Most results come back within 48 hours unless a very rare test is needed which has to go to a specialist lab further away when it might take a little longer.

Vaccination

Immunisations are provided at all primary care practices and are one of the most important services they provide. Immunisation has led to the decline of many lethal diseases including meningococcal B meningitis. The National Immunisation Schedule offers a series of vaccines free to babies, children, adolescents and adults. Visit the Ministry of Health website http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/preventative-health-wellness/immunisation/new-zealand-immunisation-schedule to find out what vaccines are on the Schedule and when they are given. Additional vaccines are provided free for certain eligible groups considered to be at high risk because of other medical conditions; find out more here http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/preventative-health-wellness/immunisation/new-zealand-immunisation-schedule. These and other vaccines such as travel vaccines can be purchased by other people if they want them. Immunisations are given by a practice nurse or doctor, having ensured beforehand that the person is not ill or suffering from allergies. Risks associated with immunisation are very rare. Children have their own document to keep a record of these injections. Under the age of 5 this is usually their Well Child/Tamariki Ora My Health Book. The immunisation record may need to be shown, for example, when starting school or early childcare. The staff will also record the immunisation details on New Zealand’s National Immunisation Register. This computerised information system holds details of all immunisations given to children here and will alert families when immunisations are due.

Immunisations are provided at all primary care practices and are one of the most important services they provide. Immunisation has led to the decline of many lethal diseases including meningococcal B meningitis.

The National Immunisation Schedule offers a series of vaccines free to babies, children, adolescents and adults. Visit the Ministry of Health website http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/preventative-health-wellness/immunisation/new-zealand-immunisation-schedule to find out what vaccines are on the Schedule and when they are given.  Additional vaccines are provided free for certain eligible groups considered to be at high risk because of other medical conditions; find out more here http://www.health.govt.nz/our-work/preventative-health-wellness/immunisation/new-zealand-immunisation-schedule. These and other vaccines such as travel vaccines can be purchased by other people if they want them.

Immunisations are given by a practice nurse or doctor, having ensured beforehand that the person is not ill or suffering from allergies. Risks associated with immunisation are very rare.

Children have their own document to keep a record of these injections. Under the age of 5 this is usually their Well Child/Tamariki Ora My Health Book. The immunisation record may need to be shown, for example, when starting school or early childcare. The staff will also record the immunisation details on New Zealand’s National Immunisation Register. This computerised information system holds details of all immunisations given to children here and will alert families when immunisations are due.

Cervical Screening

All women and people with a cervix aged 25 – 69 who have ever had intimate skin-to-skin contact or been sexually active should have regular cervical screening. This includes women who have been immunised against HPV. Together, regular screening and HPV immunisation provide the best protection against cervical cancer. There are now more options for how you have cervical screening done: a simple vaginal swab test for HPV, either done yourself or with help from a healthcare professional a cervical sample taken by a healthcare professional (used to be known as a smear test). Talk with your healthcare provider to decide which option is best for you. If HPV is found, you may need to have a follow-up test or be referred directly for colposcopy. If you’ve not yet had HPV testing, you should be screened 3 years after your last test (or 1 year if immune deficient). Once you have had an HPV test, and providing HPV is not found, your next screening will be in 5 years (or 3 years if immune deficient). For more information: Cervical screening | Time to Screen - National Screening Unit

All women and people with a cervix aged 25 – 69 who have ever had intimate skin-to-skin contact or been sexually active should have regular cervical screening. This includes women who have been immunised against HPV. Together, regular screening and HPV immunisation provide the best protection against cervical cancer.

There are now more options for how you have cervical screening done:

  • a simple vaginal swab test for HPV, either done yourself or with help from a healthcare professional
  • a cervical sample taken by a healthcare professional (used to be known as a smear test).

Talk with your healthcare provider to decide which option is best for you.

If HPV is found, you may need to have a follow-up test or be referred directly for colposcopy.

If you’ve not yet had HPV testing, you should be screened 3 years after your last test (or 1 year if immune deficient). Once you have had an HPV test, and providing HPV is not found, your next screening will be in 5 years (or 3 years if immune deficient).

For more information: Cervical screening | Time to Screen - National Screening Unit

ECG

An ECG is a recording of your heart's electrical activity. Electrode patches are attached to your skin to measure the electrical impulses given off by your heart. The result is a trace that can be read by a doctor. It can give information of previous heart attacks or problems with the heart rhythm.

An ECG is a recording of your heart's electrical activity. Electrode patches are attached to your skin to measure the electrical impulses given off by your heart. The result is a trace that can be read by a doctor. It can give information of previous heart attacks or problems with the heart rhythm.

Travel Health Advice

Another service offered to you at your GP surgery (primary care practice) is advice and immunisation before you go to another country. While you are likely to have the immunisations needed to live in New Zealand, there may be other injections you need to protect yourself before going for example to Africa or South America. In some places you will need protection from rabies or malaria. Yellow fever vaccinations are only available at approved centres; please click here to view the centres in New Zealand. Your doctor will be able to tell you what diseases you will need to be protected from in any named country and advise you on other medical matters.

Another service offered to you at your GP surgery (primary care practice) is advice and immunisation before you go to another country. While you are likely to have the immunisations needed to live in New Zealand, there may be other injections you need to protect yourself before going for example to Africa or South America. In some places you will need protection from rabies or malaria. Yellow fever vaccinations are only available at approved centres; please click here to view the centres in New Zealand. Your doctor will be able to tell you what diseases you will need to be protected from in any named country and advise you on other medical matters. 

Well Child/Tamariki Ora Health Checks – Birth to Three Years

All New Zealand children are entitled to 11 free health checks from birth to three years. The checks aim to ensure that children are growing and developing as well as possible. Included in the checks are clinical assessment, health education and family/whanau support. Baby checks are at birth and then at 24 hours, five days and around 2-4 weeks. Babies are weighed and measured to ensure that they are developing correctly. These sessions provide a great opportunity for parents to ask questions from an expert and have any problem addressed; difficulties with breastfeeding or sleep for example. They can also be used to discuss immunisations and vaccinations. These checks will be carried out by your lead maternity carer (LMC). Between the ages of 4-6 weeks and three years, there are seven core health checks available, typically these are around 4-6 weeks, 8-10 weeks, 3-4 months, 5-7 months, 9-12 months, 15-18 months and 2-3 years. These checks may be carried out by a Well Child Provider of your choice e.g. Plunket, Maori health provider, community nurse, a general practice team (doctor and practice nurse). Your LMC will be able to give you a list of Well Child Providers in your area. More information about Well Child services is available on the Ministry of Health website.

All New Zealand children are entitled to 11 free health checks from birth to three years. The checks aim to ensure that children are growing and developing as well as possible. Included in the checks are clinical assessment, health education and family/whānau support.

Baby checks are at birth and then at 24 hours, five days and around 2-4 weeks. Babies are weighed and measured to ensure that they are developing correctly. These sessions provide a great opportunity for parents to ask questions from an expert and have any problem addressed; difficulties with breastfeeding or sleep for example. They can also be used to discuss immunisations and vaccinations. These checks will be carried out by your lead maternity carer (LMC).

Between the ages of 4-6 weeks and three years, there are seven core health checks available, typically these are around 4-6 weeks, 8-10 weeks, 3-4 months, 5-7 months, 9-12 months, 15-18 months and 2-3 years. These checks may be carried out by a Well Child Provider of your choice e.g. Plunket, Māori health provider, community nurse, a general practice team (doctor and practice nurse). Your LMC will be able to give you a list of Well Child Providers in your area.

More information about Well Child services is available on the Ministry of Health website.
 

Disability Assistance

Wheelchair access, Wheelchair accessible toilet, Mobility parking space, Support to make decisions, Assistance to move around

Additional Details

Face to face / Kanohi ki te Kanohi, Phone, Speak with women / wahine, Speak with men / tane, Child / Tamariki friendly, LGBTQIA+ friendly

Contact Details

2 Te Napi Drive, Takanini

South Auckland

8:00 AM to 5:00 PM.

2 Te Napi Drive
Takanini
Papakura
Auckland 2105

Information about this location

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Get directions

Street Address

2 Te Napi Drive
Takanini
Papakura
Auckland 2105

Postal Address

PO Box 72444
Papakura
Auckland 2244

This page was last updated at 12:11PM on May 31, 2024. This information is reviewed and edited by Takanini Family Health Care.