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Auckland Orthopaedic Group

Private Service, Orthopaedics, Spinal

Arthroscopy (keyhole surgery, ankle, shoulder, knee and hip)

Over the last 30 years a large number of orthopaedic procedures on joints can be performed using an arthroscope, where a fiber optic telescope is used to look inside the joint. Through this type of keyhole surgery fine instruments can be introduced through small incisions (portals) to allow surgery to be performed without the need for large cuts. This allows many procedures to be performed as a day stay and allows quicker return to normal function of the joint.

Arthroscopic surgery is less painful than open surgery and decreases the risk of healing problems.  Arthroscopy  allows access to parts of the joints which can not be accessed by other types of surgery.

Ankle Arthroscopy
Two or three small incisions (cuts) are made in the ankle and a small telescopic instrument with a tiny camera attached (arthroscope) is inserted. This allows the surgeon to look inside the joint, identify problems and, in some cases, operate. Tiny instruments can be passed through the arthroscope to remove bony spurs, damaged cartilage or inflamed tissue.

Hip Arthroscopy
Small incisions (cuts) are made in the hip area and a small telescopic instrument with a tiny camera attached (arthroscope) is inserted. This allows the surgeon to look inside the joint, identify problems and, in some cases, operate. Tiny instruments can be passed through the arthroscope to remove loose, damaged or inflamed tissue.

Knee Arthroscopy
Several small incisions (cuts) are made on the knee through which is inserted a small telescopic instrument with a tiny camera attached (arthroscope). This allows the surgeon to look inside the joint, identify problems and, in some cases, make repairs to damaged tissue.

Shoulder Arthroscopy
This surgery involves making several small incisions (cuts) on the shoulder through which is inserted a small telescopic instrument with a tiny camera attached (arthroscope). This allows the surgeon to look inside the shoulder, identify problems and, in some cases, make repairs to damaged tissue.

This page was last updated at 3:03PM on June 8, 2021.